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sifat
Feb 15, 2022
In Fashion Forum
If you’re not using Google Analytics every day it can be a nightmare to navigate. So many paths, so many reports and so little time to learn them. However, setting up your Goals is one of the most important business metrics you can track. That’s because Goals are actions you want customers to take on your website…the bottom line KPI’s you define in your measurement plan. Goals are the metrics that matter most as they contribute to your business’ growth. How? Well Goals help you track your lead generation efforts with ease, speed and accuracy. For example, Goals can tell you how many people have signed up to your contact form along with the conversion rate for that form. Below I’ll take you through the different Goal types you can set up – what each one means, why you would use it and how to set up your Goals for tracking. You’ll also learn how to view your Goal completions and conversion rate data in Google Analytics. Note: If you have an Ecommerce site don’t track revenue using a Goal – use the Ecommerce path. We’ll cover that another day in a separate session. Metrics You Can Track by Setting Up Goals: Number of conversions. Conversion rate of your website. Which marketing campaigns drive the most conversions for your business. At what point of the funnel users drop off (you’ll have to set up funnels first to document the user path – we’ll show you how below). Wait: Don’t Set Up Goals Just for the Sake of It Note: Goals are limited to 20 per reporting view. Setting up a Goal is not an exercise you should complete just to tick the box – you know the ones I’m talking about. A Goal should be something that contributes to your bottom line and/or business growth. It should help you achieve your digital marketing KPI’s. If it doesn’t? Don’t set it. Remember: the best Goals track actions that contribute to the bottomline of your business – for example, lead generating Goals like contact form completions. Step 1 – Set Up a Goal in Google Analytics: Google Analytics Goals Guide: How to Set Up And Track Your Bottom-Line KPI’s Sign into your Google Analytics account and select the Admin account at the top of your screen. You will be presented with three separate columns ‘Account’, ‘Property’ and ‘View.’ In the ‘View’ column (it’s the last column) select ‘View.’ Click the red ‘+ New Goal’ button at the top of the table. Select the template option. Step 2 – Choose Your Goal Type: ​​​​​​Here’s an easy to understand description of each Goal type. This will help you decide the best Goal type/types that will help you measure your most pressing digital marketing objectives and KPI’s… Destination - html pages like thank you pages and confirmation screens that appear after landing pages downloads or sign-ups. Duration - minimum time period you would like users to spend on your website before it’s tracked as a Goal completion. Pages/Screens - how many pages were viewed in a session, e.g. you can set the minimum to 3 pages. Event - e.g. user interactions like when a user plays a video, clicks on an affiliate ad, signs up for a newsletter or leaves a comment on your blog. Step 3 – Learn What Each Goal Type Means & How to Set Them Up: 1. Destination Goals Google Analytics Goals Guide: How to Set Up And Track Your Bottom-Line KPI’s Destination Goals measure the end page your user has reached after taking a specific action like completing a contact form. When a user visits the set html page you’ve specified it triggers your Destination goal. Goals are perfect for tracking thank you pages or confirmation pages for prospects who have filled out a specific landing form page, for example. A Guide to Setting Up Your Destination Goals: How to Set Your Goal URL - The URL you select should be a page that your prospects see AFTER they have completed your desired conversion activity (for example, select the Thank You page URL that appears after your user has filled out a contact form). Don’t enter the complete URL – all you need to enter is the request URI. Decide Whether to Set a Monetary Value - If you know how much a conversion for your particular Goal type is worth to your business you can enter the monetary value here (e.g. €5). Google Analytics then tracks each Goal completion as a monetary value, allowing you to track how much money your conversions are making for your business. To learn how to set an appropriate Goal Value you can visit this handy Kiss Metrics Goal Values Guide. To set your value simply click the toggle on and enter the value into the box provided. If you don’t wish to set a monetary value simply leave the toggle turned off. How to Set Your Match Type - Your Match Type allows you to decide how strict Google Analytics is in when deciding if a URL counts. If you choose Exact Match only your specific chosen URL will work so this is not ideal if your system generates unique URLs for specific users. Head Match, on the other hand, tracks all visits to your specified URL no matter what comes after that URL so choose this if you’re adding UTM parameters or if you’re using unique URLs. Regular sessions are best left to the pros but you can visit this Google Analytics Guide if you’d like to give it a go. Decide Whether to Create a Goal Funnel - Goal Funnels allow you to set up defined points you would like to measure for how users move through your site in order to complete your desired goal. It’s super handy for seeing the exact point where users abandon your funnel so you know what pages need investigating and fixing. Goal funnels are only useful when you Photo Editing Services need users to follow a series of particular pages before completing your Goal. For example, something like a landing page won’t require you to set up Goal Funnels as users will usually move from the landing page straight to the thank you or confirmation screen. However, if users are moving from a checkout process to make a purchase there may be many steps you’d like to track along the way to ensure your pages are optimised for conversion. Google Analytics Goals Guide: How to Set Up And Track Your Bottom-Line KPI’s How to Set Up a Goal Funnel - Turn on the Funnel toggle by clicking on it. Then enter the URL of each page you would like to track in order to move users through the funnel and through to your Goal completion. To add another step/page to your funnel, simply click the ‘+Add another Step’ button. To ensure you require users to complete each step, simply click the ‘Required step’ toggle and it will turn on.
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sifat
Feb 15, 2022
In Fashion Forum
A social media crisis is a frightening prospect. So much so, that many organisations avoid thinking about it, have only rough plans in place, and only learn how to deal with one when they actually face a problem. Every crisis, even an online one, can be managed. If you do some preparation, careful planning and maintain a can-do team spirit you will be more than able to spot, evade, manage, survive and learn from any crisis you may face. Expert Julie Atherton has created this handy 10-step checklist to help you think about and prepare for a situation that can happen out of the blue, for anyone. It's adapted from the eBook she wrote for DMI on How to Manage a Social Media Crisis. 10 Steps to Prepare for a Social Media Crisis 1. Build a crisis team If a crisis happens, who needs to be in the team, what will be their roles and what authority will they have? It is too late to decide this in a crisis, and it is essential they have worked together before the crisis happens. Trust takes time to build. A cohesive team that trusts each other will perform much better in the heightened anxiety conditions of a crisis than a group of people who have never met before. Make sure your team is small with limited levels of hierarchy. Decisions need to be made swiftly and with authority. 2. Put processes in place Map your crisis management plan. Make sure it is short and sweet - no more than one page long - as no one has time to read “War and Peace” in a crisis! 3. Agree on a single internal communication channel Choose a separate internal communications channel which has full transparency such as Microsoft Teams or Slack to ensure you have full visibility of information across the team as the crisis develops. 10 Steps to Prepare for a Social Media Crisis 4. Decide who is in charge At what level does sign-off happen? Is the team empowered to make all decisions? When do they need to get higher-level sign off and from whom? 5. Remember who your friends are Traditional media is highly trusted by the public. Now is the time to call in those favors with your journalist and influencer buddies. Who are they and how will you reach them in an emergency? 6. Know what content you have Make sure your content repository is well documented and it is quick and easy to find content, or create new content, to tackle a crisis. 7. Decide who will be your spokesperson Someone will need to take responsibility. They may well need to be publicly humble and honest about what has happened and be seen to have the authority and credibility to take responsibility for the organization. 8. Determine the key social media channels you need to take control of Where is it essential that you disseminate your core messages in a credible and consistent way? This should include the channel where the crisis is mainly occurring, but also typically other important channels such as: Twitter - where journalists and traditional media outlets are highly active, Instagram - where influencers Philippines Photo Editor and celebrities have large followings and actively participate, and Facebook - which has huge reach and is often the go-to channel of choice for news for large sections of the public. 10 Steps to Prepare for a Social Media Crisis 9. Agree on your crisis tone of voice Ideally, this will be consistent with your brand positioning, but also empathetic, human, considered, and honest (if these aren’t already your values). Make friends not enemies. There is no need to escalate the crisis when a more conciliatory approach can build bridges and defuse the situation. 10. Decide how you will measure whether you are winning What information do you need to know if the tide is turning your way? Will you use sentiment analysis, complaint levels, stock price, or a combination of multiple factors? It is useful to have some granular level indicators as well as the headline stats, but you need to know if your crisis management is improving or damaging the situation.
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